How to Respond to Your Critics

People say that the bigger you play, the more critics you’ll have and the louder the critics get. I’ve seen this to be a general truth.

Awhile back a mentor of mine taught me that I should try to “always keep doors open”. They said this in conjunction with the idea that I should “learn to see people as a doorway instead of just a destination”.

Essentially what this means is that relationships are at the core of everything that we do as network marketers. Keeping relationships strong is not only good for you emotionally but also from a business perspective.

A good example of this can be found in the fact that I have had people who rejected working with me in my business and even semi mocked me, later refer friends to sign up as customers or builders on my team. Now this NEVER would have happened if I was overly emotionally attached or emotionally bruised when that person rejected me.

It might help you to understand that often when people criticize, it’s an ‘in the moment’ thing. and even more often they actually have good intentions. MOST people really think they’re doing good by trying to get you to give up on your network marketing dreams to focus on a “real business” or “real career”.

Become a practitioner of emotional intelligence!

Emotional Intelligence definition:

Emotional-intelligence-definition-network-marketing

 

Now, when you do find those rare people who are out criticizing just for to try to tear you down (probably in an attempt to feel better about themselves), remember this quote:

 

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.” – Theodore Roosevelt